The Suzuki Method

Dr. Shinichi Suzuki, created a method of music education based on his observation that children all over the world learn to speak their native languages beautifully and with ease. Therefore, he believed that every child who is properly trained has the ability to learn to play music beautifully.

Dr. Suzuki’s goal was not to develop professional musicians (although his method has produced many fine musicians) but to nurture loving human beings and help develop each child’s character through the study of music.

To learn what's involved in learning the Suzuki way click here.

"Where love is deep, much can be achieved"

- Dr. Shinichi Suzuki

 

Suzuki Violin - What's Involved?

Start early - Children have an enormous capacity to learn when they are young because their brains are developing at such a fast rate.

If your child is 0-3 years old come and join a Suzuki early childhood classes to nurture your child's readiness for Suzuki violin lessons.

Create a positive, nurturing environment – When a child starts to speak their first words they are greeted with much excitement and enthusiasm from parents. Parents never think, 'maybe my child will not be good at speaking'. Dr. Suzuki saw that it was the same for music learning.

Create a rich musical environment - Before a child speaks their first words they are surrounded by constant language and, in a similar way, it is important to enrich a child’s environment with music when they learn an instrument. One way we do this is through daily listening to the Suzuki CD containing the pieces that the child will learn to play.

Follow the Suzuki repertoire – This is made up of ten books, carefully designed in such a way that each piece builds on the techniques developed in the previous piece. They are gradually building their technique through learning enjoyable music.

Develop aural skills – the Suzuki method focuses on developing aural skills in the same way that a child learns to speak before learning to read. Music reading skills are developed away from the instrument first and when a child has basic technical competence, they are ready to read with their instrument.

Get involved as a parent – In the Suzuki method, the parent becomes the ‘home teacher’ and attends their child’s lessons in order to be able to help them at home. No prior musical experience is necessary but parents are encouraged to learn at least the basics of playing the violin alongside their children.

Practise daily –  ​Dr. Suzuki said, “you only have to practise on the days that you eat!” To make progress, regular repetition is important. You should have space in your schedule for 30 minutes a day with your child.

Attend group lessons – In addition to weekly private lessons, children participate in regular group lessons. Here they learn from and are motivated by one another as well as learning important ensemble skills and most importantly, having fun!

As Suzuki teachers there are many skills we are teaching alongside the skill of actually playing the violin. This includes concentration, perseverence, respect, the ability to listen, the ability to follow instructions, musical sensitivity and appreciation, self-discipline and many more. Learning an instrument has been linked to higher educational test scores. It aids emotional and behavioural maturity and can actually rewire the brain!

To give your child the benefits of learning the violin through the Suzuki method contact me today.

 

Current Suzuki Students

2020 Term Dates:

 

Term 1 - Fri 07/02 to Thu 09/04 (9 weeks)

Term 2 - Mon 27/04 to Sat 04/07 (10 weeks)

Term 3 - Mon 20/07 to Sat 26/09 (10 weeks)

Term 4 - Mon 12/10 to Sat 12/12 (9 weeks)

Term 1:

15 February

29 February

7 March

21 March

Term 2:

09 May

16+17 May

(annual concert & rehearsal) 

06 June

20 June

04 July 

(solo concert)

Term 3:

25 July

08 August

22 August

05 September

19 September

Term 4:

17 October

31 October

07 November

TBC

 (end of year concert)

2020 Group Lesson Dates:
k.ellinghamhunt@gmail.com
022 512 5706
Herne Bay & Avondale Auckland, NZ

© 2016 by Kate Ellingham-Hunt